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Projects

Ongoing Projects

The Swedish Clean Air and Climate Research Program (SCAC). 2014-2016.
Funded by the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency. PI: Johan Munthe, Swedish Environmental Research Institute.

Biodiversity and Ecosystem services in a Changing Climate – BECC 2010-2015
Strategic Research programme, funded by the Swedish Research Councils. Hans Linderholm is PI for the work package: Dendro-BECC

MERGE (ModElling the Regional and Global Earth system) 2010-2015. Strategic Research programme, funded by the Swedish Research Councils. Hans Linderholm is PI for Focus 1.2.2: Data-model comparison of large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns inferred from regional climate reconstructions.

The character, teleconnections and predictability of the Summer North Atlantic Oscillation. 2013-2015. Funded by VR. . PI: Hans Linderholm

SCOT2K: Reconstructing 2000 years of Scottish climate from tree-rings. 2013-2015. Funded by NERC. PI: Robert Wilson, University of St Andrews, UK

Impacts of growing season changes on tree growth in Sweden - combining dendrochronological and phenological data. 2013-2014. Funded by BECC. PI: Hans Linderholm
 

Past Projects

CLIVAR C20C project on the SNAO. 2011-2014. In collaboration with MetOffice Hadley Centre, UK. PIs Hans Linderholm and Chris Folland.

Exploring the decadal variability of the Asian monsoon and its impact on regional climate - from the past to the future. 2010-2012. Funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency SIDA. PI: Hans Linderholm.

The oldest churches provide insight into historical and environmental changes in central Sweden. 2012. Funded by Kungl. PIs: Hans Linderholm and Kina Linscott

Millennium - European climate of the last Millennium 2006–2010. Funded by the European Commission under the sixth framework Programme (Contract no: 017008 (GOCE)). PI Danny McCarroll, Swansea University, UK

Multi-proxy reconstruction of drought and its relationship with forest fire activity in southern and central Fennoscandia since AD 1500 2008-2010. Funded by Formas (The Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning). Principal investigator (PI): Hans Linderholm.

The Greater Baltic Area Paleoclimate Database (BALPAL) 2008-2010. Funded by VR (The Swedish Research Council). PI: Hans Linderholm.

An assessment of afforestation in Egyptian deserts – the ecological effects on tree species of irrigating artificial forests with treated wastewater 2009-2011. Funded by VR/ Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency SIDA. PIs: Hans Linderholm and Emad Farahat, Helwan University, Egypt.

Assessing Holocene atmospheric circulation dynamics in Scandinavia 2010-2012. Funded by VR (The Swedish Research Council). PI: Dan Hammarlund, Lund University, Sweden.

Spatial and temporal patterns of regional climate variability in Fennoscandia during the past 500 years – A dendroclimatological approach. 2004-2008. Funded by VR (The Swedish Research Council). PI: Hans Linderholm.

Evaluating climate variability and its ecological impacts in the past 300 years using tree-ring and historical data from Shaanxi Province, China. 2004–2007. Funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency Principal investigator: Hans Linderholm.

EMULATE - European and North Atlantic daily to multidecadal climate variability. 2003–2005. Funded by the European Commission under the fifth Framework Programme (EVK2-CT-2002-00161 EMULATE). PI: Phil Jones, Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia, UK.

Exploring the decadal variability of the Asian monsoon and its impact on regional climate - from the past to the future


Biodiversity and Ecosystem services in a Changing Climate – BECC. 2010-2015.

Strategic Research programme, funded by the Swedish Research Councils. HL is PI for the work package: Dendro-BECC http://www.miljovetenskap.lu.se/becc

BECC is a new strategic research initiative hosted by the Faculty of Science at Lund University that strives for a better understanding of the impacts of climate change and land use decisions on terrestrial ecosystems and biodiversity, addressing the consequences of ecosystem changes for human beings and socio-economic systems. The vision of BECC is to evolve interdisciplinary research approaches that contribute to the sustainable management of ecosystems and biodiversity in a rapidly changing world.

BECC aims to:

  • Assess climate change impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem services in Sweden, with a particular focus on forest, agricultural and subarctic ecosystems, but also including aquatic systems that are affected by runoff from forest and farmland.
  • Support regional, national and international policymakers through the scientific evaluation of policy options combining adaptation and mitigation strategies to climate change with conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem resilience.
  • Create synergies and added value to the climate impacts research at Lund University and University of Gothenburg by bringing together modelling, empirical ecology, economics and social science analysis, and by integrating stakeholder experience in the research process.

BECC is a collaboration between Lund University and University of Gothenburg.

MERGE (ModElling the Regional and Global Earth system). 2010-2015.

Strategic Research programme, funded by the Swedish Research Councils. HL is PI for Focus 1.2.2:

Data-model comparison of large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns inferred from regional climate reconstructions. http://www.miljovetenskap.lu.se/merge

MERGE is a new strategic research initiative hosted by the Faculty of Science at Lund University. Reliable modelling of the Regional and Global Earth system is of utmost importance for society. Even though climate science is sufficiently robust to justify action on climate change mitigation and adaptation, the need to narrow down uncertainties that are central to assessing climate change and its impacts persists. Such uncertainties pertain to climate sensitivity, Earth System feedbacks and interactions and to incomplete understanding of key climate forcings and the interplay of physical and biological climate/Earth System components. This can be tackled with research that in turn supports mitigation and adaptation efforts on global, regional and local arenas.
The vision of MERGE is to establish and develop a major multidisciplinary climate/Earth System modelling node with world leading science and research education on climate/terrestrial biosphere interactions (including vegetation, land use, biogeochemical cycles and aerosols). This is accompanied by societal dialogue in the spirit of social learning by both scientists and stakeholders.

MERGE aims to:

  • Strategic research on key global and regional Earth System models, focusing on the terrestrial biosphere as a critical climate system component, leading to Improved local, regional and global climate models with climate/vegetation interactions;
  • Key contributions in national and international arenas, and fostering a new generation of scientists skilled in Earth System science and advanced climate modelling;
  • Improve the societal relevance and use of climate model research and results.

MERGE is a collaboration between: Lund University, University of Gothenburg, Rossby Centre/SMHI, Linnaeus University, Chalmers University of Technology and Royal Institute of Technology.

Exploring the decadal variability of the Asian monsoon and its impact on regional climate - from the past to the future. 2010-2012.

Funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency SIDA. PI: Hans Linderholm.

The Asian summer monsoon (ASM) provides precipitation during summer to the parts of Asia where nearly half of the world’s population resides, a sensitive region whose economy is mainly based on agriculture. This project will investigate interdecadal dynamics and driving forces of the ASM, so more accurate predictions of future monsoon variability can be made. To do that monsoon variability before man influenced climate, will be examined and natural variability of the ASM estimated and quantified. This will be achieved using high-resolution precipitation proxies from India and China, combined with General Circulation Model (GCM) paleoclimate simulations. By choosing the GCMs that best agree with the proxies, we will constraint the models, so that the most accurate models can be used to predict future ASM variability under a changing climate with less uncertainty than is achieved today.

Millennium - European climate of the last Millennium. 2006–2010.

Funded by the European Commission under the sixth framework Programme (Contract no: 017008 (GOCE)). (HL is an associated scientist in the project) www.millenniumproject.net

The Millennium project is a multidisciplinary consortium of more than 38 partners from 16 European countries bringing together historians, chemists, physicists, biologists, geographers, climate modellers and geologists in a multi-disciplinary effort to reconstruct the climate of Europe over the last 1000 years using historical documents ranging from ships logs, church annals and harvest records, and natural archives such as tree rings, insect and plant remains from lakes and peat bogs, ice cores and sea shells. Reconstructing the climate of the past is important because it will allow us to say whether the warming seen in recent years is really unusual.

Multi-proxy reconstruction of drought and its relationship with forest fire activity in southern and central Fennoscandia since AD 1500. 2008-2010.

Funded by Formas (The Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning). Principal investigator (PI): Hans Linderholm.

The project will provide reconstructions of past summer precipitation extremes in southern and central Fennoscandia for the last 500 years from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and oak (Quercus robur) tree-ring data. Spatiotemporal extents, durations and frequencies of past droughts will be estimated, and related to forest fire activity through joint analyses of instrumental data, regional tree-ring chronologies and a network of independently reconstructed forest fire histories. Using relationships between precipitation variability, atmospheric circulation and forest fires the effect of future climate change on the fire regime and dynamics of carbon released by forest fires will be predicted using GCM scenarios.

The project will try to answer the following questions: (1) Have there been a trend in temporal and spatial patterns of precipitation extremes over the period studied? (2) If so, have these changes been coherent in southern and central Fennoscandia? (3) Have these changes been synchronous with precipitation dynamics in Europe? (4) What was the spatial extent of the historical Fennoscandian droughts and has it changed over time? (4) Is there a temporal association between drought a forest fires in Fennoscandia, and if so (5) has the strength of this association changed over time, which may indicate a change in strength of climate forcing upon forest fire activity? Finally, can we expect increased risk for forest fires in a changing climate?

The Greater Baltic Area Paleoclimate Database (BALPAL). 2008-2010.

Funded by VR (The Swedish Research Council). PI: Hans Linderholm.

To better understand natural climate variability and quantify the anthropogenic influence on the recent climate change, knowledge of past climates is imperative. Quality controlled climate time-series with known uncertainties derived from climate proxies are a core requirement for understanding past climate variability. The Paleoclimate Group (PG) at the University of Gothenburg (GU) develops high resolution climate datasets which are valuable resource for the paleoclimate research community. However, in general, these datasets currently exist only as internal research products. We propose to create a climate database to make these products available to the research community where researchers can freely utilize the data but also make spatiotemporal analyses of the climate information in different proxies. Furthermore, we expect that by providing this service, fellow researchers will submit their data, resulting in a high-quality base for advancing paleoclimate research in north-western Europe. We refer to the proposed database as the Greater Baltic Area Paleoclimate Database (BALPAL).

An assessment of afforestation in Egyptian deserts – the ecological effects on tree species of irrigating artificial forests with treated wastewater. 2009-2011.

Funded by VR/ Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency SIDA. PIs: Hans Linderholm and Emad Farahat, Helwan University, Egypt.

In North Africa, future climate change could critically undermine efforts for sustainable development, where it may add to existing problems such as desertification. The plantation of trees to act as barriers against desert expansion has become common in arid areas like North Africa. Due to the lack of water for irrigation, tests have been made to utilize lightly treated wastewater as a source of water to such fringe forests. The principal objective for our project is detecting the effect of different irrigation systems (drip and flooding) and water quality on the growth of regional tree species using dendrochronological and ecological techniques. This will enable us to elucidate the direct effects of water quality and irrigation method on the growth and ecology of trees in different habitats.

The specific objectives of the proposed project are to: 1) Evaluate the growth evolution of a variety of tree species in artificial plantations under different irrigation systems 2) Inspect direct, indirect and long-term effects of wastewater on the ecological fitness, phenology and wood quality of different species 3) Quantitative and qualitative effects of the artificial forest as new habitats in our deserts on the biodiversity of plants and other ecosystem components.

Assessing Holocene atmospheric circulation dynamics in Scandinavia. 2010-2012.

Funded by VR (The Swedish Research Council). PI: Dan Hammarlund, Lund University, Sweden.

The general aims of the project are to characterize large-scale, centennial- to millennial-scale changes in atmospheric circulation across the Scandinavian Peninsula during the Holocene, and to attribute these changes to external and internal forcing mechanisms. Multi-decadal simulations of synoptic climatic conditions (mean state and variability) will be performed with the regional climate model REMOiso, which is equipped with water isotope diagnostics. Modelled geographical fields of the oxygen-isotope composition of precipitation at high spatial resolution (50 km grid cells or less), representative of different circulation modes will be evaluated together with associated boundary conditions, e.g. insolation, sea level and SST configuration. Model outputs will be compared to precipitation oxygen-isotope reconstructions inferred from lake sediment records (existing data along a N-S transect through Sweden and new reconstructions to be obtained from SW. Norway and S. Finland). Supportive information on past changes in prevailing storm-track positions and changes in the seasonal distribution of precipitation will be obtained from Norwegian glacier status records. Corresponding analyses of precipitation isotopic changes during the past millennium based on more highly resolved proxy records will provide a basis for evaluation of couplings to the North Atlantic Oscillation, potential related connections throughout the Holocene, and climate dynamics in a circumpolar perspective.

 

Sidansvarig: Robert Karlsson|Sidan uppdaterades: 2015-06-17
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